Archive for November, 2014

Nov.19 – John Thomas Agnew

November 19, 2014

On this day in 1918, John Thomas Agnew was born to John Wesley Agnew, a bookkeeper for Monon Railroad, and his wife Mary, a feisty-minded and strong-willed woman who loved babies and telling stories. John Thomas grew up without a lot of luxury, and always excelled in school. He found a flute on the street & taught himself how to play it, later writing marches for Purdue band. As a youth, he contracted a disease that took him out of school and caused one leg to be shorter than the other. For this reason he limped the rest of his life and could not tie his own shoes, but that never slowed him down. He became Prof. of Mechanical Engineering at his alma mater, Purdue University, did research at Genl Motors in Michigan, and eventually moved his family to Philadelphia where he became Dean of Engineering at Drexel U. On weekends he was grading papers and reading but always available to his kids. He loved wearing old white t-shirts and bumming around in Natl Parks and hunting for fossils in the summer. He was a small man, a scientist at heart and agnostic but believed in contributing to the advancement of humanity. He died at age 50, as many Agnew men do, with heart trouble, just after my 16th birthday. He was my father, and I miss him.

On this day in 1918, John Thomas Agnew was born to John Wesley Agnew, a bookkeeper for Monon Railroad, and his wife Mary, a feisty-minded and strong-willed woman who loved babies and telling stories. John Thomas grew up without a lot of luxury, and always excelled in school. He found a flute on the street & taught himself how to play it, later writing marches for Purdue band. As a youth, he contracted a disease that took him out of school and caused one leg to be shorter than the other. For this reason he limped the rest of his life and could not tie his own shoes, but that never slowed him down. He became  Prof. of Mechanical Engineering at his alma mater, Purdue University, did research at Genl Motors in Michigan, and eventually moved his family to Philadelphia where he became Dean of Engineering at Drexel U. On weekends he was grading papers and reading but always available to his kids. He loved wearing old white t-shirts and bumming around in Natl Parks and hunting for fossils in the summer. He was a small man, a scientist at heart and agnostic but believed in contributing to the advancement of humanity. He died at age 50, as many Agnew men do, with heart trouble, just after my 16th birthday. He was my father, and I miss him.
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2 little poems

November 18, 2014

This is the Time

This is the time

When all is well

When work is done

And time stands still

The night takes over

And thoughts take flight

Into worlds unknown

The dreams of midnight.

cfblack 11-17-2014

The Future

I wonder what

the future holds,

What will the news be tomorrow?

Will we hear the fateful decision

that spawns a riot across America?

It all seems so pointless, sometimes.

It all seems so very unreal.

Corruption riddles the system throughout,

There will be no redemption here.

All we can do is call upon God

and raise up our arms to each other,

Shield ourselves against the cold,

Walk through this night together.

Hidden Words no.66

November 6, 2014

O CHILDREN OF THE DIVINE AND INVISIBLE ESSENCE!

Ye shall be hindered from loving Me and souls shall be perturbed as they make mention of Me.

For minds cannot grasp Me nor hearts contain Me. — Baha’u’llah

Jestem

nothing really to say

November 6, 2014

There is so much to say, I cannot really say anything. I stare at my plastic-stacked-drawers of trinkets, stickers, pencils and markers, units marked “Unity” “Oneness” ” Love” “Service” — from doing children’s classes this summer, and it seems like a lifetime ago.

My office room now contains a laptop from my new school. There are criminology books strewn around the room, a full notebook of materials from every class. Still wondering how I will ever catch up before the semester ends. Finals Week exactly 4 weeks away, and a holiday in between now and then.

I think about each student and now know them all by name. I have learned them all. I still do not know a thing about what some of them really think. What do they think about? What are their worries? What do they spend their time on away from class? Do they look forward to being at home for Thanksgiving? Do they have a goal? What do they expect in their future?

They are all beginning to worry about their grades and want to keep them as high as possible. But will they study? Will they take that book out of reserve at the library and look through the chapters? It’s anyone’s guess.

My ever present hope is that each one of them will attempt their best. Time to run that sprint to the finish line — all the way in! How much steam do you have left in reserve?

And then a blessed month off.